Upcoming Events

Event:  
Bible Timeline Seminar

Location:
Freehold, NJ
St. Robert Bellermine

Date: 11/17-18/17 

Flyer

more scheduled events

 

Pilgrimage Updates!

January 2018 Annual Holy Land Pilgrimage:

Some seats still remain for January 11-25, 2018! Post-tour to Petra SOLD OUT. Click here for forms and more information

April 2018 "Faith of the Irish" Pilgrimage

Registration Now Open for April 21-30, 2018 with optional pre-tour and Discipleship Seminar with Jeff Cavins. Tour Hosts: Jeff & Emily Cavins and Fr. Matt Guckin.

May 2018 "Time of Decision" Holy Land Pilgrimage

SOLD OUT! Waitlist only for May 14-24, 2018 pilgrimage with Fr. Mike Schmitz and Jeff Cavins. Click here for forms and more information.

Please view Cavins Tours photo gallery for a glimpse of some of our past pilgrimages.

Here is what a recent pilgrim had to say about our annual Holy Land pilgrimage!

 Thank you for a most wonderful, spiritual experience these past 2 weeks. The pilgrimage surpassed any expectations I had. Your teachings, Jeff, were so meaningful at each site. You are able to pull together all the history, the spirituality, the geography of the area, the archeological aspects, etc. so well to make the whole story make sense. You have challenged us to grow spiritually not only with questions to ask ourselves, but ways to ponder those question in our lives, and the wonderful "weapons" we have to tackle them, grow from them, and make necessary changes in our lives so that we may be better disciples of the Lord and spread the Good News to others. Certainly my times in adoration, and daily prayer will be enriched because of this Holy Land experience. ~~ Barb K

Please feel free to contact us at Cavins Tours phone number --763-420-1074.

 

Navigation
Search
Wednesday
Oct182006

How Did Jesus Use Questions?

As many of you know I love to study not only what Jesus said, but his methodology as well. As a first century rabbi Jesus was well acquainted with the popular teaching methods of his time. Questions had an important place on Jesus teaching palette; the four Gospels record more than one hundred questions asked by Him. His questions were not merely to obtain information. They served a variety of purposes. I thought I would share with you twelve ways that Jesus incorporated questions into his teaching.

1. Some questions stimulated interest and formed a point of contact. He asked the disciples, "Who do people say that the Son of man is? (Matt 16:13)

2. Some questions helped His pupils clarify their thinking; for example, "What did Moses command you?" (Mk 10:3)

3. Some questions expressed an emotion, such as disgust or amazement. He responded to the Pharisees, "How can you, being evil, speak what is good?" (Matt. 12:34)

4. Some questions introduced an illustration. "Suppose one of you shall have a friend..." (Luke 11:5-6)

5. Some questions were used to emphasize a truth. "for what will a man be profited, if he gains the whole world, and forfeits his soul?" (Matt 16:26)

6. Some questions helped pupils apply the truth; for instance, "which of these three do you think proved to be a neighbor to the man who fell into the robbers' hands?" (Lk 10:36)

7. Some questions were to provide information for Himself. "how many loaves do you have?" (Matt 15:34)

8. Some questions helped establish a relationship between the teacher and pupil, as in, "Who touched me?" (Lk 8:45)

9. Some questions were asked to rebuke or silence His opposers: "The baptism of John was from what source?... And answering Jesus, the said, We do not know." (Matt 21:25-27)

10. Some questions were rhetorical; they needed no answer. "is not life more than food, and the body than clothing?" (Matt 6:25)

11. Some questions were asked to bring conviction; for example, "Have you never read...?" (Mark 2:25)

12. Some questions were examinations. "Simon, son of John, do you love me?" (John 21:15-17)

Tuesday
Oct172006

Pilgrimages

August 2009

Alaskan Scripture Cruise: July 29 - August 5, 2009

Join Jeff and Emily and family for a 7-day Alaskan Cruise August, 2009!

During the at-sea portion of the cruise we will be offering the Seminar at Sea with teaching sessions brought to you by The Great Adventure. We will have "Sailing with the Psalms" for adults by Jeff, "The Book of Matthew" for teens by Fr. Mike Schmitz and "The Great Adventure Kids" for children by Emily Cavins and Kirstin Rau. What makes this cruise extra special is the opportunity to attend Mass daily.

Many details can be found on the website such as information about the Holland America ship, an itinerary, the pricing, and a description of the speakers and seminars. We are delighted to have Kelly Wahlquist serving as hostess of the cruise, so please be in touch with her if you have questions at: kmwahlquist@mac.com.

There is plenty of opportunity for family adventure at sea and in the Alaskan wilderness as well as spiritual growth through seminars and daily mass. Brochures are available here, and information is currently available at www.cavinstours.com. Also, you can click here to download a registration form.

Holy Land Pilgrimages

Jeff and Emily lead pilgrimages each year to the Holy Land. For information regarding Holy Land trips or pilgrimages to other locations, please check this page for the latest travel updates! We'd love to have you join us!

January 2010

Join Jeff for a pilgrimage to the Holy Land January 5-16, 2010. We are taking deposits for this exciting tour now. Click here for our brochure. Click here for registration form.

A reservation of $300 ($75 nonrefundable) will hold your spot.

A pilgrimage to the Holy Land will change your life forever! Mass will never be same, praying the Rosary will take on new meaning as you are transported in your mind to those locations and the memory of walking where Jesus walked will linger in your prayer time. For more information on this upcoming pilgrimage, contact Emily Cavins at cavinspilgrimages@gmail.com or Bonnie Lane at 952-474-0903.

Footsteps of St. Paul

March 2010

Turkey/Greece Pilgrimage --   Information Coming Soon!

We will follow in the Footsteps of St. Paul as we journey through Turkey & Greece accompanied by Bishop Aquila of Fargo. We will soon be taking deposits for this trip where pilgrims will experience Scripture teachings at the sites where St. Paul established the first churches and from where he wrote his letters. Flights depart from Minneapolis, Denver and New York. For more info contact Emily contact Emily Cavins at cavinspilgrimages@gmail.com or Bonnie Lane at 952-474-0903.

Tuesday
Oct172006

Contact

Great Adventure Seminar Booking Information for Jeff Cavins

For speaking events involving the Great Adventure Seminars contact Elizabeth, Ascension Press scheduling,http://greatadventureonline.com/seminar/request t to receive information about Jeff coming to your parish or organization. In your message, please include your full name, organization name, mailing address or email address, phone number and the date/dates you are interested in.

 

 

If you have something to mail to us directly, please use the following address:

Jeff or Emily Cavins ~ PO Box 1533 ~ Maple Grove, MN 55311

Tuesday
Oct172006

Ezekiel/Revelation Chart

I mentioned in my class on the Book of Revelation that there is a parallel between the book of Ezekiel and the book of Revelation. All you have to do is Click Here for the pdf download of that chart. Enjoy!

Saturday
Sep302006

A Plethora of Purgatory Ponderings

Many questions regarding purgatory have been asked during this study: "Who believes in purgatory?" "What is the teaching regarding it?" "What is it like?" "How do you get out?" "When did it come into existence?" "What are some Scriptural references to it?" And, above all, "What exactly is it?" (Just to name a few!) Luckily for us, Jeff will be addressing purgatory in lecture 7, so be sure not to play hookey that day! Until then, here's a brief description to answer the specific questions posed:

First let us define purgatory:

Purgatory refers to a temporary state of purification for those who have died in the state of grace but still need to get rid of any lingering imperfections (venial sins, earthly attachments, self-will) before entering the perfection of heaven. (CCC1030-1032) It is an application of the graces merited for us by Jesus on the cross, so that we might be made pure before entering heaven, and can be thought of as the final stage of sanctification (i.e., the process by which we become holy) This stage of sanctification is an immersion into the love of Christ, which removes the residue of imperfection, cleansing us from the stain of sin. In the simplest analogy, it's like showering and donning our best attire before we meet the King.

The Church has never defined the exact nature of purgatory in reference to space and time; such as, what kind of "place" it is or "how long it lasts." For space and time are merely human images used in an attempt to describe the mystery of eternal life.

The Church does clearly teach that purgatory is the final purification of the elect and is entirely different from the punishment of the damned. (CCC 1030) Sadly, many of our Protestant brothers and sisters, and many Catholics as well, misunderstand this teaching, and believe purgatory to be a place of punishment rather than a state of purification. This misunderstanding is rooted in the middle ages when the notion of fire as a symbol of purification became associated with punishment after death. Through exaggerated preaching and artwork, the image of purgatory became that of a minor version of hell, the only difference being that purgatory is temporary. This misguided image of purgatory as a painful fire burning punishment spread in the Western Church and unfortunately continues to smolder in the minds of many today. In contrast to this image of old, today's theologians consider purgatory as a positive process and believe that the pain associated with the process of purification isn't a torturous pain, but rather the pain felt as "the person 'burns' with remorse because he or she is separated from God who is infinite goodness and joy. This separation, though temporary, is the result of a person's own actions on earth." (This Is Our Faith, Michael Francis Pennock, Ave Maria Press, 1989)

According to the Catholic Encyclopedia, the Catholic doctrine of purgatory supposes the fact that some die with smaller faults for which there was no true repentance, and also the fact that the temporal penalty due to sin is in times not wholly paid in this life. The proofs for the Catholic position, both in Scripture and in Tradition, are bound up also with the practice of praying for the dead. For why pray for the dead, if there be no belief in the power of prayer to afford solace to those who as yet are excluded from the sight of God?

The Church formulated her doctrine of faith on Purgatory at the Councils of Florence (1439) and Trent (1563). Yet, before the Decrees of Florence and Trent, this doctrine -that many who have died are still in a place of purification and that prayers avail to help the dead- is seen in the very earliest Christian tradition. Tertullian "De corona militis" mentions prayers for the dead as an Apostolic ordinance, and in "De Monogamia" (cap. x, P. L., II, col. 912) he advises a widow "to pray for the soul of her husband, begging repose for him and participation in the first resurrection".

The Apostolic practice of praying for the dead continued on from Tertullian (c 211) through the teachings of Hippolytus (c235), Orgien (c254) and other Church Fathers and passed into the liturgy of the Church. This is as evident in the fourth century as it is in the twentieth. St. Cyril of Jerusalem (Catechet. Mystog., V, 9, P.G., XXXIII, col. 1116) describing the liturgy, writes: "Then we pray for the Holy Fathers and Bishops that are dead; and in short for all those who have departed this life in our communion; believing that the souls of those for whom prayers are offered receive very great relief, while this holy and tremendous victim lies upon the altar."

Today the Church holds to those practices and teaches that the prayers offered in atonement for the dead, above all in the Eucharistic Sacrifice, can "help" those "in" purgatory attain the beatific vision of God (CCC 1032).

The doctrine of purgatory was held by pre-Christian Jews, post-Christian Jews, Catholics, and Eastern Orthodox. It was not denied until the Protestant Reformation, and thus only Protestants deny it today.

Proofs in Scripture for the doctrine of purgatory are: 2 Macc 12:46, Matt 5:25-26, Matt12:32, 1 Cor 3:15, 2 Tim 1:16-18, 1Peter 3:18-20, 1 John 5:16-17 and one I'm sure we'll soon talk about, Rev 21:27 (Nothing unclean will be allowed to enter heaven.)

References:

Catholic Apologetics

Did Jesus Have a Last Name, Matthew Pinto & Jason Evert

Catholic for a Reason, Scott Hahn, Ph.D., and Leon J. Suprenant, Jr.

This Is Our Faith, Michael Francis Pennock

Catholic Customs and Traditions, Greg Dues

EWTN.com