Upcoming Events

Event:
Franciscan University Conferences
Institute of Applied Bibilcal Studies
Defending the Faith 

Location:
Steubenville, OH

Date: 7/26-30/17

Conferences Registration

more scheduled events

 

Pilgrimage Updates!

January 2018 Annual Holy Land Pilgrimage:

Registration is now open for January 11-25, 2018! Also available Post-tour to Petra. Click here for forms and more information

April 2018 "Faith of the Irish" Pilgrimage

Registration Now Open for April 21-30, 2018 with optional pre-tour and Discipleship Seminar with Jeff Cavins. Tour Hosts: Jeff & Emily Cavins and Fr. Matt Guckin.

May 2018 "Time of Decision" Holy Land Pilgrimage

Registration now open for May 14-24, 2018 with Fr. Mike Schmitz and Jeff Cavins. Click here for forms and more information.

Please view Cavins Tours photo gallery for a glimpse of some of our past pilgrimages.

Here is what a recent pilgrim had to say about our annual Holy Land pilgrimage!

 Thank you for a most wonderful, spiritual experience these past 2 weeks. The pilgrimage surpassed any expectations I had. Your teachings, Jeff, were so meaningful at each site. You are able to pull together all the history, the spirituality, the geography of the area, the archeological aspects, etc. so well to make the whole story make sense. You have challenged us to grow spiritually not only with questions to ask ourselves, but ways to ponder those question in our lives, and the wonderful "weapons" we have to tackle them, grow from them, and make necessary changes in our lives so that we may be better disciples of the Lord and spread the Good News to others. Certainly my times in adoration, and daily prayer will be enriched because of this Holy Land experience. ~~ Barb K

Please feel free to contact us at Cavins Tours phone number --763-420-1074.

 

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Tuesday
Oct172006

Contact

Great Adventure Seminar Booking Information for Jeff Cavins

For speaking events involving the Great Adventure Seminars contact Elizabeth, Ascension Press scheduling,http://greatadventureonline.com/seminar/request t to receive information about Jeff coming to your parish or organization. In your message, please include your full name, organization name, mailing address or email address, phone number and the date/dates you are interested in.

 

 

If you have something to mail to us directly, please use the following address:

Jeff or Emily Cavins ~ PO Box 1533 ~ Maple Grove, MN 55311

Tuesday
Oct172006

Ezekiel/Revelation Chart

I mentioned in my class on the Book of Revelation that there is a parallel between the book of Ezekiel and the book of Revelation. All you have to do is Click Here for the pdf download of that chart. Enjoy!

Saturday
Sep302006

A Plethora of Purgatory Ponderings

Many questions regarding purgatory have been asked during this study: "Who believes in purgatory?" "What is the teaching regarding it?" "What is it like?" "How do you get out?" "When did it come into existence?" "What are some Scriptural references to it?" And, above all, "What exactly is it?" (Just to name a few!) Luckily for us, Jeff will be addressing purgatory in lecture 7, so be sure not to play hookey that day! Until then, here's a brief description to answer the specific questions posed:

First let us define purgatory:

Purgatory refers to a temporary state of purification for those who have died in the state of grace but still need to get rid of any lingering imperfections (venial sins, earthly attachments, self-will) before entering the perfection of heaven. (CCC1030-1032) It is an application of the graces merited for us by Jesus on the cross, so that we might be made pure before entering heaven, and can be thought of as the final stage of sanctification (i.e., the process by which we become holy) This stage of sanctification is an immersion into the love of Christ, which removes the residue of imperfection, cleansing us from the stain of sin. In the simplest analogy, it's like showering and donning our best attire before we meet the King.

The Church has never defined the exact nature of purgatory in reference to space and time; such as, what kind of "place" it is or "how long it lasts." For space and time are merely human images used in an attempt to describe the mystery of eternal life.

The Church does clearly teach that purgatory is the final purification of the elect and is entirely different from the punishment of the damned. (CCC 1030) Sadly, many of our Protestant brothers and sisters, and many Catholics as well, misunderstand this teaching, and believe purgatory to be a place of punishment rather than a state of purification. This misunderstanding is rooted in the middle ages when the notion of fire as a symbol of purification became associated with punishment after death. Through exaggerated preaching and artwork, the image of purgatory became that of a minor version of hell, the only difference being that purgatory is temporary. This misguided image of purgatory as a painful fire burning punishment spread in the Western Church and unfortunately continues to smolder in the minds of many today. In contrast to this image of old, today's theologians consider purgatory as a positive process and believe that the pain associated with the process of purification isn't a torturous pain, but rather the pain felt as "the person 'burns' with remorse because he or she is separated from God who is infinite goodness and joy. This separation, though temporary, is the result of a person's own actions on earth." (This Is Our Faith, Michael Francis Pennock, Ave Maria Press, 1989)

According to the Catholic Encyclopedia, the Catholic doctrine of purgatory supposes the fact that some die with smaller faults for which there was no true repentance, and also the fact that the temporal penalty due to sin is in times not wholly paid in this life. The proofs for the Catholic position, both in Scripture and in Tradition, are bound up also with the practice of praying for the dead. For why pray for the dead, if there be no belief in the power of prayer to afford solace to those who as yet are excluded from the sight of God?

The Church formulated her doctrine of faith on Purgatory at the Councils of Florence (1439) and Trent (1563). Yet, before the Decrees of Florence and Trent, this doctrine -that many who have died are still in a place of purification and that prayers avail to help the dead- is seen in the very earliest Christian tradition. Tertullian "De corona militis" mentions prayers for the dead as an Apostolic ordinance, and in "De Monogamia" (cap. x, P. L., II, col. 912) he advises a widow "to pray for the soul of her husband, begging repose for him and participation in the first resurrection".

The Apostolic practice of praying for the dead continued on from Tertullian (c 211) through the teachings of Hippolytus (c235), Orgien (c254) and other Church Fathers and passed into the liturgy of the Church. This is as evident in the fourth century as it is in the twentieth. St. Cyril of Jerusalem (Catechet. Mystog., V, 9, P.G., XXXIII, col. 1116) describing the liturgy, writes: "Then we pray for the Holy Fathers and Bishops that are dead; and in short for all those who have departed this life in our communion; believing that the souls of those for whom prayers are offered receive very great relief, while this holy and tremendous victim lies upon the altar."

Today the Church holds to those practices and teaches that the prayers offered in atonement for the dead, above all in the Eucharistic Sacrifice, can "help" those "in" purgatory attain the beatific vision of God (CCC 1032).

The doctrine of purgatory was held by pre-Christian Jews, post-Christian Jews, Catholics, and Eastern Orthodox. It was not denied until the Protestant Reformation, and thus only Protestants deny it today.

Proofs in Scripture for the doctrine of purgatory are: 2 Macc 12:46, Matt 5:25-26, Matt12:32, 1 Cor 3:15, 2 Tim 1:16-18, 1Peter 3:18-20, 1 John 5:16-17 and one I'm sure we'll soon talk about, Rev 21:27 (Nothing unclean will be allowed to enter heaven.)

References:

Catholic Apologetics

Did Jesus Have a Last Name, Matthew Pinto & Jason Evert

Catholic for a Reason, Scott Hahn, Ph.D., and Leon J. Suprenant, Jr.

This Is Our Faith, Michael Francis Pennock

Catholic Customs and Traditions, Greg Dues

EWTN.com

Saturday
Sep302006

Rev 8:9 Symbolism of 1/3

What is 1/3 symbolic of in Revelation 8:9?

It must be remembered that the structure of the book of Revelation is an entirely different treatment of time. It is not a neat linear chronological telling of events, but rather it is a different way of story telling that comes from a different vision of history. This approach is called recapitulative history. It means simply that the book returns to the same events recounted earlier to tell about them in a different way, each time portraying them with greater intensity.

With that in mind, we see that the three times in which judgment is poured out upon the wicked, the level of intensity increases: first, through the opening of the seven seals; then the sounding of the seven trumpets; and last, through the emptying of the seven bowls. In Revelation 6:8, the opening of the fourth seal, we are told that Death and Hades "were given power over 1/4 of the earth, to kill with the sword and with famine and with pestilence and by wild beasts of the earth." Thus, it would follow in recapitulative history that the next judgment, the sounding of the trumpets, would usher in a greater devastation -and that it does. "The devastation which the trumpets introduce is greater than that produced by the opening of the first four seals: a third of the earth is affected, not just a quarter."

(The Navarre Bible, Four Courts Press, 2003) And, as we move into the seven bowls of plagues (Rev 15-17) we witness divine justice. As the wrath of God on the followers of the beast intensifies, the punishment is increased to the total destruction of evil; and in heaven, songs of victory ring true as "the righteous rejoice to see their enemy overwhelmed and welcome the kingdom of God and the imminent marriage of the Lamb." (The Navarre Bible)

Kelly Wahlquist

Saturday
Sep302006

Non-Christians and Salvation

Revelation reveals if we die in Christ we will be crowned and seated on thrones. For those who do not die in Christ (Non Christians), will they be crowned in the same glory?

In the Gospel of John, Jesus answers Nicodemus's question regarding the attainment of the Kingdom of God with, "Amen, amen, I say to you, no one can enter the kingdom of God without being born of water and Spirit." (Jn 3:5) As Catholics, we affirm that Baptism is necessary for salvation, for through our Baptism we are immersed into the death of Christ and rise with him as a "new creature" (2 Corinthians 5:17) -a creature "reborn of water and the Spirit.'"(CCC1257) The Catechism goes on to explain that God has bound salvation to the sacrament of Baptism, but he himself is not bound by his sacraments. Thus, Baptism is necessary for salvation; however, since Christ died for the salvation of all, there are those who can be saved without Baptism. Catechumens, those who strive to do God's will without ever knowing Jesus Christ, and those without the knowledge about the faith or to whom the Gospel has never been proclaimed are such examples. (CCC 1260)

The Council Fathers of Vatican II do not exclude anyone acting in good faith from the possibility of salvation. In the Dogmatic Constitution on the Church (Lumen Gentium), paragraph 16 the Council Fathers wrote:

"Nor is God remote from those who in shadows and images seek the unknown God, since he gives to all men life and breath and all things (cf. Acts 17:25-28), and since the Savior wills all men to be saved (cf. 1 Timothy 2:4). Those who, through no fault of their own, do not know the Gospel of Christ or his Church, but who nevertheless seek God with a sincere heart, and moved by grace, try in their actions to do his will as they know it through dictates of their conscience'those too, may achieve eternal salvation.

"Nor shall divine providence deny the assistance necessary for salvation to those who, without any fault of theirs, have not yet arrived at an explicit knowledge of God, and who, not without grace, strive to lead a good life."

That said, we must remember that just being Christian does not earn us our way into heaven. (Rom 3:20) "Salvation is the free gift of God through Jesus Christ (Eph 2:8-9; Rom 3:24-25; 6:23; CCC 161-169) but, we must accept and freely cooperate with this gift. (Phil 2:12-13; Gal 5:6; CCC1949)" For the reason that salvation is a gift, so too is Baptism a gift as it is conferred upon those who bring nothing of their own. In fact, St. Gregory of Nazianzus referred to Baptism as "God's most beautiful and magnificent gift." (Oratio 40, 3-4; PG 36,361C) Ultimately, we can only entrust the souls of those who die without the gift of Baptism (those who do not die in Christ) to the mercy of God (CCC 1261) remembering, that God's mercy is infinite and cannot be bound by human limitations.

References: Lumen Gentium; Second Vatican Council, Nov. 21, 1964; Catechism of the Catholic Church; Did Adam and Eve have Belly Buttons? And Did Jesus Have a Last Name? Matthew Pinto & Jason Evert; www.americancatholic.com